Law Enforcement to Prevent Irresponsible Flying of Drones

Law Enforcement to Prevent Irresponsible Flying of Drones

International Air Transport Association (IATA) said on December 5, 2017, advised law enforcement authorities to ensure safety measures for recreational drones to prevent danger to passenger aircraft

Risks due to flying drones crashing into landing aircraft posed a threat. As noted in October 2017, a drone collided with an aircraft landing at an airport in Canada was one of the several such incidents recording near-misses between drones and passenger planes in Europe.

“This is something we do not want to see continue. We see a strong role for law enforcement. One of the concerns we have is the unprofessional operation of small recreational drones because people do not understand the risks they could have against manned aviation,” said Rob Eagles, director of air traffic management infrastructure at IATA.

The authority should fine registered drone users who fly drones into unauthorized areas, in order to lessen risks of collision.

An active deterrent is required to be laid to help people understand the risks associated with irresponsible use of small recreational drones. IATA is also seeking to raise awareness and educate users.

Several airlines and cargo are seeking opportunities of employing commercial drones for activities such as small parcel deliveries, transporting goods to remote or isolated areas that are not economically viable for larger aircraft.

This is not an attempt to replace current aviation, however, to contemplate the new entrants in the airlines. Companies such as DHL, UPS, Amazon, and Alibaba are conducting tests for drone deliveries.

At airports, these drones can be used to inspect the aircraft or runway as a means of improving safety and minimizing costs. Furthermore, bird-shaped drones could be used to chase off wildlife at airports.

It has been predicted that the use of drones could increase the speed of visual aircraft inspections by 20 times. Typical inspections last for 6 to 10 hours, costing airlines around US$ 10,000 for every hour the plane is on the ground, according to IATA. Thus, drones could help change the future of airline inspections, by minimizing time and costs for inspection.

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